Unraveling Bambooas sustainable design material

The properties of bamboo make it something of a paragon for human character, as this Japanese proverb expresses. Also a bit of a paradox. While raw strength is important, the ability to bend and adapt is far more valuable. And surprisingly enough, it’s true that the wood from a flexible bamboo cane is stronger than the wood from a rigid oak tree.

“The bamboo that bends is stronger than the oak that resists”.

Unraveling Bambooas sustainable design material

“The bamboo that bends is stronger than the oak that resists”.

The properties of bamboo make it something of a paragon for human character, as this Japanese proverb expresses. Also a bit of a paradox. While raw strength is important, the ability to bend and adapt is far more valuable. And surprisingly enough, it’s true that the wood from a flexible bamboo cane is stronger than the wood from a rigid oak tree.

Why bamboo bikes?

Bamboo has been gaining immense importance when it comes to sustainable products. We want to live in harmony with nature. It’s an instinctive thing. And when we see the frame of a bamboo bike, we immediately understand that we’re combining technology and nature.

Fast growing, sustainable and renewable resource

Bamboo is naturally renewable and the fastest-growing plant in the world (some species can grow 35 inches in 24 hours). And bamboo keeps growing after it is harvested – no replanting required.

 

Lightweight and strong

Bamboo is very light yet offers more tensile strength than steel (28,000 newtons per square inch, compared to 23,000 for steel), and it doesn't shatter like carbon fibre or dent like aluminium. And the secret lies in the structure and quality of its fibers.

 

Air purifier & Cleaner

Bamboo allows us to enjoy healthier and cleaner air since this plant produces up to 35% more oxygen than other trees in the atmosphere and absorbs carbon dioxide (CO2).

 

 

Natural Impact Absorption

Bamboo can absorb vibrations and shocks like bumps in the road, making it comfortable to ride over long distances. Don’t worry, as bamboo endure daily usages or falls due to its resistance and shock absorption.

 

Bamboo FAQ’s

Are you curious to know more about bamboo and our bikes? We share here some quick answers to the most asked questions. If you don’t find answers to your doubts, just leave us a message.

Unlike conventional products that have been gaining fame for damaging our planet, bamboo gives the products natural characteristics that promote their durability. Moreover, bamboo absorbs carbon dioxide (CO2) and releases 35% more oxygen than other trees in the atmosphere. Compared to the typical materials used in a bicycle, bamboo is as light as aluminium, stiff like steel and the most sustainable alternative.

Currently, there are more than 1645 different species of bamboo. Some can adapt to colder climates. Usually, when we think of bamboo, we tend to associate it only with the Asian continent. However, it can be found in Latin America, in some southern regions of the USA and Africa, due to the enormous humidity conditions in these regions. Growing bamboo in Europe is also starting to become a reality.

Forget steel (too heavy), aluminium (too weak) or carbon fibre (too expensive and not eco-friendly). When it comes to building a bicycle frame, nothing beats bamboo. These materials are organic and sustainable, strong and light, rigid yet flexible, and absorb vibrations without the need for suspension.

In terms of the number of materials, it takes only a couple of bamboo stalks to build a bike frame. Unlike their steel, aluminium, titanium and carbon fibre cousins, bamboo frames leave almost no carbon footprint during manufacturing. The only notable blemish on their eco-cred is a resin epoxy used to reinforce the joints.

The acceleration and efficiency of bamboo and carbon are very similar–some riders cannot tell any difference in this category.  Bamboo climbs very quickly and accelerates and sprints like the best carbon bikes. Nevertheless, its additional vibration damping (due to the bamboo’s fleshy lignin) and progressive stiffness combine to create a bike that is more supple and comfortable without giving up speed and performance

With nowadays’ technology, it is still impossible to create a bicycle made 100% of bamboo. Some parts like the chain, the brakes, tires and some specific components play an essential role in the bicycle but need different materials with distinct functions that bamboo cannot provide.

Bamboo bikes were first patented in England by the Bamboo Cycle Company and introduced to the general public on 26 April 1894. A US patent was applied for in 1895 by August Oberg and Andrew Gustafson and granted in 1896. However, with the development of tougher industrial metals, such as steel and aluminium, large-scale usage of bamboo to build bicycles never happened.

Though bicycles are a staple of human transportation, in both rural and urbanised areas, bamboo bicycles are currently not widely used. However, with the advent of sustainable mobility, bamboo is being used again, primarily for high-end touring bicycles.

You’ll never know where you can find kung fu pandas. So stay alert 😀

Meet Our bamboo bikes